Creative block

When I was working full time as a commercial artist, I spent all my waking hours daydreaming about how much better I would have it, if I would be just doing my own thing. I won’t lie. It is much better. A thousand times better.

It is… that many times better.

I will draw that and post a link here later.

Nevertheless, just because something feels like a riding a unicorn through clouds filled with little pink bunny rabbits, doesn’t make it any less stressful.

Doing a project is hard work. Doing your own project is many times harder. It is that much harder because of the exact reason it feels so good: you get to decide everything.

This opens up endless possibilities. There is literally an uber-mega-triple-tera-bajjilion ways you can do something you are pulling out of thin air. I didn’t count, but I know they are that many… or even more, because of how many times I got stuck. Since I started to build this project I got stuck in ways I would never get stuck when doing commissioned work.

Commercial artwork has clear boundaries. It is usually an art piece you are required to do, to fit a particular product, to be featured on a particular medium, that is bound to a particular budget and has to attend a particular market. Once you have all those limitations in place, making decisions comes pretty easily.

Doing your own project, on the other hand, is like going to a candy store with a million dollars cash. You can have literally anything you want.

Turns out the Buddhists are right: Getting what you want doesn’t solve anything. Whatever you want, and then get, isn’t interesting anymore and you immediately want something better… or something else. Not only getting anything you want does not solve your original problem… it doesn’t even solve the wanting problem. Every decision you make leads to more and more possibilities until you are face-to-face with a fractal zombie-hydra of indecisiveness that wants to eat your brains.

The way out of this Halloween scenario is to create some sort of boundaries around your project so it doesn’t grow into a Greek epic trash movie.
But how do you put boundaries around a dream? Once you do that , the dream becomes reality and the thrill of being on the edge of chaos disappears.

No more pink bunny rabbits. No more unicorns. The moment you turn your project into reality you take a free-fall from heaven onto earth and are smack-dab in the real world again facing the blank piece of paper that sent you off into the unknown in search for a good sentence to describe what the hell your project is about.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE SPECIFICATIONS OF SOLO UP TO THIS DATE.

(Pepe, Petra, Penelope and Butterfly, the cat : Copyright © Petra Elster – All rights reserved.)

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